Whole Milk Ricotta from a Vermont Kitchen

August 7th, 2012 / comments 3

Wine c egbert Whole Milk Ricotta from a Vermont KitchenWine is often used to add flavor in cooking, but whining is not a good addition to any dish, EXCEPT when it results in a new and wonderful recipe. Here’s the story:

I was complaining to my son, Noah, that peach season had finally arrived and I couldn’t find fresh ricotta anywhere. “If I were in Sicily, I’d to walk to the market, and get as much as I wanted and, I’d have a cappuccino and maybe even a cannoli on the way.”

With absolutely no sympathy, he said, “Why don’t you make your own, instead of whining about it? It’s really easy. You only need whole milk and white vinegar and, if you make it in the microwave, clean-up is a breeze.”

I wasn’t convinced that any ricotta made in Vermont could compare with what I was missing but, decided to give it a try. Using Noah’s recipe, I made my first batch in less than five minutes and cleanup was a breeze. Here’s how I did it: … read more

Kohlrabi Fritters from a Vermont CSA

July 10th, 2012 / Comments 0

Our weekly CSA pick-up at Fable Farm is an opportunity to see friends and vegetables both old and new.

potluck sign Kohlrabi Fritters from a Vermont CSAWe look forward to sharing a pot luck meal with old friends like Shoshana and T and their daughters Tess and Devi, both discerning vegetarians, and new friends whose names I hope I’ll remember the next time I see them. … read more

Portugese Milk Mayo from a Vermont Kitchen

January 11th, 2012 / Comments 1

It’s not to late to make a New Year’s resolution. Rather than resolving to go to the gym three times a week, or to sort out the extra clothes at the back of my closet, or to re-read at least one classic before the daffodils appear; I have resolved to have an empty fridge when it’s time to travel to Italy in March.

rainbow carrots c egbert Portugese Milk Mayo from a Vermont Kitchen

Rainbow Carrots

(I wanted to share my most recent painting, Rainbow Carrots, even though carrots have nothing to do with this post. )

The first step is to dispose of all of the half-filled jars of mystery sauces that have accumulated since we returned from Italy last spring. The second, and perhaps more difficult part is resisting the jars of exotic sauces at the market. I will make do with only three jars of sauce, mustard, ketchup and mayonnaise. The mustard is grainy Dijon mustard, the ketchup is what remains of the homemade ketchup I made as a Christmas gift for Charles, and I will make mayo as we need it. … read more

Ketchup from my Vermont Kitchen

December 14th, 2011 / comments 3

tomato c egbert Ketchup from my Vermont KitchenWhen I was a child, one of my jobs was to refill the large, red plastic tomato with ketchup. My sister and I squeezed that tomato to squirt ketchup on French fried potatoes, grilled American cheese sandwiches, hamburgers, hot dogs and scrambled eggs. When I moved to Washington, DC, I wanted to be sophisticated and cosmopolitan. I listened to classical music, read the articles as well as the cartoons in the New Yorker and banished ketchup from my kitchen. … read more

Corn Chowder & Resolution

November 9th, 2011 / comments 5

Soon it will be Cooking Season. Thanksgiving is coming and then there’s December, filled with family birthdays, parties and  holidays. Lots of time will be spent at the market gathering food to refill the fridge and pantry.

Pt market bag 02 c egbert Corn Chowder & Resolution

There will be weeks of  marathon of mixing, stirring, slicing, dicing, creaming and blending. It was time to make meals that are simple to prepare, have a limited number of ingredients and are even better the second time around. Corn Chowder is one way to do that. … read more

Quinoa Salad – A Middle Eastern Dinner Salad

August 17th, 2011 / comments 2

Quinoa is the seed from a plant related to beets, spinach and tumbleweed. Who knew? Tumbleweed makes me think of Gene Autry singing ‘… rolling along with the tumbling, tumbleweed’, but quinoa originated in the Andes Mountains where it has been an important food for more than six thousand years.

A gluten free, complete protein it was called the ‘mother of all grains’.

With all of this to recommend it, I decided to add it to my pantry. My first quinoa creation was a resounding failure – a mushy mixture that tasted like wet laundry, (Actually, I have never eaten wet or dry laundry, but that’s the best description I can come up with). … read more

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